Sun, 23/Apr/2017 15:34

Auroras

Aurorae Borealis have fascinated me for a long time. Solar winds, magnetosphere interactions, etc are so cool. I love to read about them. I recently read a short article regarding the history of auroral research by Syun-Ichi Akasofu, professor at University of Alaska in Fairbanks. Fairbanks happens to be the most probable city from which to see the northern lights.

Something that caught my interst in the article was how human scientists really are. It is amazing how some would doggedly stick to their hypothesis, or one they thought was right, until evidence was heaped against that idea. Not only do they object to others doing research they think is fallacious but some may actually try to smear others work. I noted this in an earlier post too. I used to think that scientists would work hard for absolute truth and not let their egos and ideas get in the way. I have found that just the egos get bigger. 

To quote the Dr. Akasufu, "Even a small step in scientific progress, such as those described here, requires much struggle against long-held views." ... "If one observation does not agree with the prevailing ideas of the time, graduate students and established scientists should pursue the issue so long as they are convinced of the validity of their observations. Such diligence has the potential to change the course of science in unexpected ways,...". It pays to think outside the box. If I am working to solve a problem and I think exactly the same way as everyone before me, then I will not find a solution unless it hits me in the face. 





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